Just like Mom used to do it

I love having a kitchen all to myself!!!

Ross is on a rice and chicken diet, so yesterday I made just that: Rice and chicken. But that got boring. So I thought why not try to make something a little different, but still light.

So I made chicken and noodles… just like my mom used to do it! Now, I’m not sure if she made her own broth and noodles..but I did (thanks to the instruction from the husband of one of my friends and the recipe from my aunt).

Here’s what I did:

1/2 chicken
oil
2 carrots, chopped
1/2 onion, chopped
Water
salt
white pepper

3 eggs
enough flour so the dough isn’t sticky
couple pinches of salt
(Lightly beat eggs, then keep adding flour until dough isn’t sticky. Roll out on a floured surface as thick as you want the noodles to be. Add more flour to the top to prevent sticking. Roll the dough in a jellyroll. Cut in pieces across then in half. Pull apart. DONE!)

Put the backbone and wing into an oiled pan. Brown it for a few minutes. Add as much water as you want broth. Add the carrots and onion, and salt and pepper. Bring to a boil. Once boiling, add the rest of the chicken and turn heat to low for a nice simmer (covered). Let that go for an hour. Strain. Pulled meat out. Put in noodles and just enough broth to cover them with a little extra. Put carrots and onions back in. Bring to a boil. Add shredded chicken. Cook for 15 or so minutes until the noodles are done. If broth is too thin, add a couple tablespoons of flour mixed with cold water to thicken. Add salt and pepper to taste. MMMM!!!

8 Comments

  1. candango November 11, 2010 at 8:33 pm Permalink

    Cate, you do realize that your recipe above is very close to the Moldovan "zeama", don't you? The only thing missing is the "leostan" (if that is the correct spelling). It translates to "lovage" in English, a first cousin of celery, and adds a unique aroma and flavor. Thanks for the recipe.

    Reply
  2. candango November 11, 2010 at 8:33 pm Permalink

    Cate, you do realize that your recipe above is very close to the Moldovan "zeama", don't you? The only thing missing is the "leostan" (if that is the correct spelling). It translates to "lovage" in English, a first cousin of celery, and adds a unique aroma and flavor. Thanks for the recipe.

    Reply
  3. candango November 11, 2010 at 8:33 pm Permalink

    Cate, you do realize that your recipe above is very close to the Moldovan "zeama", don't you? The only thing missing is the "leostan" (if that is the correct spelling). It translates to "lovage" in English, a first cousin of celery, and adds a unique aroma and flavor. Thanks for the recipe.

    Reply
  4. candango November 11, 2010 at 8:33 pm Permalink

    Cate, you do realize that your recipe above is very close to the Moldovan "zeama", don't you? The only thing missing is the "leostan" (if that is the correct spelling). It translates to "lovage" in English, a first cousin of celery, and adds a unique aroma and flavor. Thanks for the recipe.

    Reply
  5. latercater November 12, 2010 at 2:35 pm Permalink

    Yes I know it is very similar, but zeama is a soup… this is more thicker. I'll post a picture 🙂

    Reply
  6. latercater November 12, 2010 at 2:35 pm Permalink

    Yes I know it is very similar, but zeama is a soup… this is more thicker. I'll post a picture 🙂

    Reply
  7. latercater November 12, 2010 at 2:35 pm Permalink

    Yes I know it is very similar, but zeama is a soup… this is more thicker. I'll post a picture 🙂

    Reply
  8. latercater November 12, 2010 at 2:35 pm Permalink

    Yes I know it is very similar, but zeama is a soup… this is more thicker. I'll post a picture 🙂

    Reply

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